Gulf of Mexico Data Atlas Gulf of Mexico Data Atlas

Fishes

Atlantic Croaker

Relative abundance analysis for Atlantic croaker, gray triggerfish, gulf butterfish, lane snapper, red snapper, sand seatrout, silver seatrout, spot and vermilion snapper. Relative abundance is expressed in catch per unit effort (CPUE). CPUE by 10-minute longitude by latitude blocks are summarized from 11,637 40 foot shrimp trawls taken during Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) fishery-independent Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys from 1987 to 2009. CPUE is expressed as the number caught per 1-hour tow. The data presented here are summarized from Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys. The Summer Shrimp/Groundfish Survey started collecting data in 1982 while the Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Survey started collecting data in 1985. The survey design of both surveys was standardized in 1987. Therefore, the data presented here are from 1987 to 2009. Since 1987, the strategy for the trawl surveys has been that day/night sampling sites are chosen randomly in areas stratified by depth and statistical area. Trawl stations sampled by NMFS, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana are made with a standard SEAMAP 40-ft net, and Texas samples with a 20-ft net. Depth strata consist of 1-fm intervals from 5 to 20 fm, a 2-fm interval from 20 to 22 fm, a 3-fm interval from 22 to 25 fm, 5 fm intervals from 25 to 50 fm and a 10-fm interval from 50 to 60 fm. Trawls are towed perpendicularly to the depth contours and cover the entire depth stratum on each station. Single tows are for a maximum of 55 minutes; for certain stations, a series of consecutive trawl tows is necessary to cover a given depth stratum, with a minimum individual tow across each stratum of 10 minutes and a maximum tow of 55 minutes. The Texas vessels tow 10 minutes parallel to the depth stratum. The survey design was changed in 2009 for NMFS samples and 2010 for all other SEAMAP participants except Texas. With the new survey design, trawls are towed for 30 minutes regardless of whether a depth stratum is covered or not and stations are no longer stratified on whether they are taken during the day or night. Until 2008, Florida did not participate in the trawl surveys and trawl samples were not taken off Florida. In 2008, Florida began participating in the Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys and NMFS began trawling off Florida. All species of fishes and invertebrates from trawls are identified, enumerated, and weighed. Weights and individual measurements on selected species other than commercial shrimp are also recorded. Total counts from each trawl station are standardized to account for sampling effort and converted to a catch per unit effort (CPUE). CPUE is expressed as the number of fish caught per 1 hour of tow time for a 40 ft trawl. Mean CPUE was then summarized by 10 minute longitude by latitude blocks in which trawling occurred. Since Texas vessels do not strictly adhere to the survey design, data from Texas were not used for this summary.

Additional image formats and visualization tools:

Atlantic Croaker Atlas Dataset

Gag Grouper

Gag grouper (juvenile,adult), red grouper (juvenile,adult), red snapper (larval, juvenile, adult), and vermilion snapper (larval, juvenile) are routinely taken during Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) fishery-independent bottom longline (2000-2009), plankton (1986-2006), reef fish (1993-2009), and trawl (1987-2009) surveys throughout the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. This map presents the occurrence results from these surveys of these species.

Additional image formats and visualization tools:

Gag Grouper Atlas Dataset

Gray Triggerfish

Relative abundance analysis for Atlantic croaker, gray triggerfish, gulf butterfish, lane snapper, red snapper, sand seatrout, silver seatrout, spot and vermilion snapper. Relative abundance is expressed in catch per unit effort (CPUE). CPUE by 10-minute longitude by latitude blocks are summarized from 11,637 40 foot shrimp trawls taken during Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) fishery-independent Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys from 1987 to 2009. CPUE is expressed as the number caught per 1-hour tow. The data presented here are summarized from Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys. The Summer Shrimp/Groundfish Survey started collecting data in 1982 while the Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Survey started collecting data in 1985. The survey design of both surveys was standardized in 1987. Therefore, the data presented here are from 1987 to 2009. Since 1987, the strategy for the trawl surveys has been that day/night sampling sites are chosen randomly in areas stratified by depth and statistical area. Trawl stations sampled by NMFS, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana are made with a standard SEAMAP 40-ft net, and Texas samples with a 20-ft net. Depth strata consist of 1-fm intervals from 5 to 20 fm, a 2-fm interval from 20 to 22 fm, a 3-fm interval from 22 to 25 fm, 5 fm intervals from 25 to 50 fm and a 10-fm interval from 50 to 60 fm. Trawls are towed perpendicularly to the depth contours and cover the entire depth stratum on each station. Single tows are for a maximum of 55 minutes; for certain stations, a series of consecutive trawl tows is necessary to cover a given depth stratum, with a minimum individual tow across each stratum of 10 minutes and a maximum tow of 55 minutes. The Texas vessels tow 10 minutes parallel to the depth stratum. The survey design was changed in 2009 for NMFS samples and 2010 for all other SEAMAP participants except Texas. With the new survey design, trawls are towed for 30 minutes regardless of whether a depth stratum is covered or not and stations are no longer stratified on whether they are taken during the day or night. Until 2008, Florida did not participate in the trawl surveys and trawl samples were not taken off Florida. In 2008, Florida began participating in the Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys and NMFS began trawling off Florida. All species of fishes and invertebrates from trawls are identified, enumerated, and weighed. Weights and individual measurements on selected species other than commercial shrimp are also recorded. Total counts from each trawl station are standardized to account for sampling effort and converted to a catch per unit effort (CPUE). CPUE is expressed as the number of fish caught per 1 hour of tow time for a 40 ft trawl. Mean CPUE was then summarized by 10 minute longitude by latitude blocks in which trawling occurred. Since Texas vessels do not strictly adhere to the survey design, data from Texas were not used for this summary.

Additional image formats and visualization tools:

Gray Triggerfish Atlas Dataset

Gulf Butterfish

Relative abundance analysis for Atlantic croaker, gray triggerfish, gulf butterfish, lane snapper, red snapper, sand seatrout, silver seatrout, spot and vermilion snapper. Relative abundance is expressed in catch per unit effort (CPUE). CPUE by 10-minute longitude by latitude blocks are summarized from 11,637 40 foot shrimp trawls taken during Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) fishery-independent Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys from 1987 to 2009. CPUE is expressed as the number caught per 1-hour tow. The data presented here are summarized from Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys. The Summer Shrimp/Groundfish Survey started collecting data in 1982 while the Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Survey started collecting data in 1985. The survey design of both surveys was standardized in 1987. Therefore, the data presented here are from 1987 to 2009. Since 1987, the strategy for the trawl surveys has been that day/night sampling sites are chosen randomly in areas stratified by depth and statistical area. Trawl stations sampled by NMFS, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana are made with a standard SEAMAP 40-ft net, and Texas samples with a 20-ft net. Depth strata consist of 1-fm intervals from 5 to 20 fm, a 2-fm interval from 20 to 22 fm, a 3-fm interval from 22 to 25 fm, 5 fm intervals from 25 to 50 fm and a 10-fm interval from 50 to 60 fm. Trawls are towed perpendicularly to the depth contours and cover the entire depth stratum on each station. Single tows are for a maximum of 55 minutes; for certain stations, a series of consecutive trawl tows is necessary to cover a given depth stratum, with a minimum individual tow across each stratum of 10 minutes and a maximum tow of 55 minutes. The Texas vessels tow 10 minutes parallel to the depth stratum. The survey design was changed in 2009 for NMFS samples and 2010 for all other SEAMAP participants except Texas. With the new survey design, trawls are towed for 30 minutes regardless of whether a depth stratum is covered or not and stations are no longer stratified on whether they are taken during the day or night. Until 2008, Florida did not participate in the trawl surveys and trawl samples were not taken off Florida. In 2008, Florida began participating in the Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys and NMFS began trawling off Florida. All species of fishes and invertebrates from trawls are identified, enumerated, and weighed. Weights and individual measurements on selected species other than commercial shrimp are also recorded. Total counts from each trawl station are standardized to account for sampling effort and converted to a catch per unit effort (CPUE). CPUE is expressed as the number of fish caught per 1 hour of tow time for a 40 ft trawl. Mean CPUE was then summarized by 10 minute longitude by latitude blocks in which trawling occurred. Since Texas vessels do not strictly adhere to the survey design, data from Texas were not used for this summary.

Additional image formats and visualization tools:

Gulf Butterfish Atlas Dataset

King Mackerel

Since 1982, Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) plankton surveys have been conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service in cooperation with the states of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. The SEAMAP Spring Plankton Survey began in 1982 while the SEAMAP Fall Plankton Survey began in 1985. A SEAMAP Winter Plankton Survey took place in 1983, 1984, 1993, 1996, 2004, 2008, 2009, and 2011. Plankton sampling is carried out during these surveys at predetermined SEAMAP stations arranged in a fixed, systematic grid pattern across the entire Gulf of Mexico. Most but not all SEAMAP stations (designated by a unique SEAMAP number) are located at ~56 km or 0.5-degree intervals along this grid. Some SEAMAP stations are located at less than 56 km intervals especially along the continental shelf edge, while others have been moved to avoid obstructions, navigational hazards, or shallow water. Most SEAMAP plankton samples are taken during either dedicated plankton or shrimp/groundfish surveys, but over the years additional samples were taken using SEAMAP gear and collection methods at locations other than designated SEAMAP stations and/or outside established SEAMAP surveys, e.g. during Louisiana seasonal trawl surveys, SEAMAP Squid/Butterfish survey; and other serendipitous or special projects. Although other plankton sampling gear types and mesh sizes have been used throughout the SEAMAP time series, the standard sampling gear and methodology used to collect plankton samples during SEAMAP surveys are bongo and/or neuston nets. A 61 cm (outside diameter) bongo net fitted with 0.335 mm mesh netting is fished in an oblique tow path from a maximum depth of 200 m or to 2-5 m off the bottom at station depths less than 200 m. A single or double, 2x1 m pipe frame neuston net fitted with 0.950 mm mesh netting is the other standard gear employed and it is towed at the surface with the frame half-submerged for 10 minutes. Maximum bongo tow depth is calculated using the amount of wire paid out and the wire angle at the 'targeted' maximum tow depth, or observed and recorded in real time throughout the tow. A mechanical flowmeter is mounted off-center in the mouth of each bongo net to record the volume of water filtered. During surveys in the early part of the time series a flowmeter was placed in only one side of the bongo gear. Water volume filtered during bongo net tows ranges from ~20 to 600 m3 but is typically 30 to 40 m3 at the shallowest stations and 300 to 400 m3 at the deepest stations. This map presents the relative abundance (number per hour) of larval king mackerel, red snapper, spanish mackerel, and vermilion snapper by 30-minute longitude by latitude blocks. Data are from 2,342 bongo net samples taken from 1986 to 2006 as part of plankton sampling associated with the Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) Fall Plankton Survey. Abundance is the number of fish larvae per 10 m2 of sea surface within each 0.5 degree longitude by latitude block. Data are limited to samples collected with 61 cm bongo nets fitted with 0.333 mm mesh nets.

Additional image formats and visualization tools:

King Mackerel Atlas Dataset

Lane Snapper

Relative abundance analysis for Atlantic croaker, gray triggerfish, gulf butterfish, lane snapper, red snapper, sand seatrout, silver seatrout, spot and vermilion snapper. Relative abundance is expressed in catch per unit effort (CPUE). CPUE by 10-minute longitude by latitude blocks are summarized from 11,637 40 foot shrimp trawls taken during Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) fishery-independent Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys from 1987 to 2009. CPUE is expressed as the number caught per 1-hour tow. The data presented here are summarized from Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys. The Summer Shrimp/Groundfish Survey started collecting data in 1982 while the Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Survey started collecting data in 1985. The survey design of both surveys was standardized in 1987. Therefore, the data presented here are from 1987 to 2009. Since 1987, the strategy for the trawl surveys has been that day/night sampling sites are chosen randomly in areas stratified by depth and statistical area. Trawl stations sampled by NMFS, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana are made with a standard SEAMAP 40-ft net, and Texas samples with a 20-ft net. Depth strata consist of 1-fm intervals from 5 to 20 fm, a 2-fm interval from 20 to 22 fm, a 3-fm interval from 22 to 25 fm, 5 fm intervals from 25 to 50 fm and a 10-fm interval from 50 to 60 fm. Trawls are towed perpendicularly to the depth contours and cover the entire depth stratum on each station. Single tows are for a maximum of 55 minutes; for certain stations, a series of consecutive trawl tows is necessary to cover a given depth stratum, with a minimum individual tow across each stratum of 10 minutes and a maximum tow of 55 minutes. The Texas vessels tow 10 minutes parallel to the depth stratum. The survey design was changed in 2009 for NMFS samples and 2010 for all other SEAMAP participants except Texas. With the new survey design, trawls are towed for 30 minutes regardless of whether a depth stratum is covered or not and stations are no longer stratified on whether they are taken during the day or night. Until 2008, Florida did not participate in the trawl surveys and trawl samples were not taken off Florida. In 2008, Florida began participating in the Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys and NMFS began trawling off Florida. All species of fishes and invertebrates from trawls are identified, enumerated, and weighed. Weights and individual measurements on selected species other than commercial shrimp are also recorded. Total counts from each trawl station are standardized to account for sampling effort and converted to a catch per unit effort (CPUE). CPUE is expressed as the number of fish caught per 1 hour of tow time for a 40 ft trawl. Mean CPUE was then summarized by 10 minute longitude by latitude blocks in which trawling occurred. Since Texas vessels do not strictly adhere to the survey design, data from Texas were not used for this summary.

Additional image formats and visualization tools:

Lane Snapper Atlas Dataset

Red Grouper

Gag grouper (juvenile,adult), red grouper (juvenile,adult), red snapper (larval, juvenile, adult), and vermilion snapper (larval, juvenile) are routinely taken during Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) fishery-independent bottom longline (2000-2009), plankton (1986-2006), reef fish (1993-2009), and trawl (1987-2009) surveys throughout the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. This map presents the occurrence results from these surveys of these species.

Additional image formats and visualization tools:

Red Grouper Atlas Dataset

Red Snapper

Gag grouper (juvenile,adult), red grouper (juvenile,adult), red snapper (larval, juvenile, adult), and vermilion snapper (larval, juvenile) are routinely taken during Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) fishery-independent bottom longline (2000-2009), plankton (1986-2006), reef fish (1993-2009), and trawl (1987-2009) surveys throughout the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. This map presents the occurrence results from these surveys of these species..

Additional image formats and visualization tools:

Red Snapper Atlas Dataset

Sand Seatrout

Relative abundance analysis for Atlantic croaker, gray triggerfish, gulf butterfish, lane snapper, red snapper, sand seatrout, silver seatrout, spot and vermilion snapper. Relative abundance is expressed in catch per unit effort (CPUE). CPUE by 10-minute longitude by latitude blocks are summarized from 11,637 40 foot shrimp trawls taken during Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) fishery-independent Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys from 1987 to 2009. CPUE is expressed as the number caught per 1-hour tow. The data presented here are summarized from Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys. The Summer Shrimp/Groundfish Survey started collecting data in 1982 while the Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Survey started collecting data in 1985. The survey design of both surveys was standardized in 1987. Therefore, the data presented here are from 1987 to 2009. Since 1987, the strategy for the trawl surveys has been that day/night sampling sites are chosen randomly in areas stratified by depth and statistical area. Trawl stations sampled by NMFS, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana are made with a standard SEAMAP 40-ft net, and Texas samples with a 20-ft net. Depth strata consist of 1-fm intervals from 5 to 20 fm, a 2-fm interval from 20 to 22 fm, a 3-fm interval from 22 to 25 fm, 5 fm intervals from 25 to 50 fm and a 10-fm interval from 50 to 60 fm. Trawls are towed perpendicularly to the depth contours and cover the entire depth stratum on each station. Single tows are for a maximum of 55 minutes; for certain stations, a series of consecutive trawl tows is necessary to cover a given depth stratum, with a minimum individual tow across each stratum of 10 minutes and a maximum tow of 55 minutes. The Texas vessels tow 10 minutes parallel to the depth stratum. The survey design was changed in 2009 for NMFS samples and 2010 for all other SEAMAP participants except Texas. With the new survey design, trawls are towed for 30 minutes regardless of whether a depth stratum is covered or not and stations are no longer stratified on whether they are taken during the day or night. Until 2008, Florida did not participate in the trawl surveys and trawl samples were not taken off Florida. In 2008, Florida began participating in the Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys and NMFS began trawling off Florida. All species of fishes and invertebrates from trawls are identified, enumerated, and weighed. Weights and individual measurements on selected species other than commercial shrimp are also recorded. Total counts from each trawl station are standardized to account for sampling effort and converted to a catch per unit effort (CPUE). CPUE is expressed as the number of fish caught per 1 hour of tow time for a 40 ft trawl. Mean CPUE was then summarized by 10 minute longitude by latitude blocks in which trawling occurred. Since Texas vessels do not strictly adhere to the survey design, data from Texas were not used for this summary.

Additional image formats and visualization tools:

Sand Seatrout Atlas Dataset

Silver Seatrout

Relative abundance (number per hour) of silver seatrout (Cynoscion nothus) by 10-minute longitude by latitude blocks summarized from 11,637 40-ft shrimp trawls taken during the Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) fishery-independent Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys from 1987 to 2009. Catches of silver seatrout are standardized to account for sampling effort (CPUE) and expressed as the number of fish per 1 hour tow. Mean CPUE is then summarized by 10 minute longitude by latitude blocks in which trawling occurred.

Additional image formats and visualization tools:

Silver Seatrout Atlas Dataset

Spanish Mackerel

Since 1982, Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) plankton surveys have been conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service in cooperation with the states of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. The SEAMAP Spring Plankton Survey began in 1982 while the SEAMAP Fall Plankton Survey began in 1985. A SEAMAP Winter Plankton Survey took place in 1983, 1984, 1993, 1996, 2004, 2008, 2009, and 2011. Plankton sampling is carried out during these surveys at predetermined SEAMAP stations arranged in a fixed, systematic grid pattern across the entire Gulf of Mexico. Most but not all SEAMAP stations (designated by a unique SEAMAP number) are located at ~56 km or 0.5-degree intervals along this grid. Some SEAMAP stations are located at less than 56 km intervals especially along the continental shelf edge, while others have been moved to avoid obstructions, navigational hazards, or shallow water. Most SEAMAP plankton samples are taken during either dedicated plankton or shrimp/groundfish surveys, but over the years additional samples were taken using SEAMAP gear and collection methods at locations other than designated SEAMAP stations and/or outside established SEAMAP surveys, e.g. during Louisiana seasonal trawl surveys, SEAMAP Squid/Butterfish survey; and other serendipitous or special projects. Although other plankton sampling gear types and mesh sizes have been used throughout the SEAMAP time series, the standard sampling gear and methodology used to collect plankton samples during SEAMAP surveys are bongo and/or neuston nets. A 61 cm (outside diameter) bongo net fitted with 0.335 mm mesh netting is fished in an oblique tow path from a maximum depth of 200 m or to 2-5 m off the bottom at station depths less than 200 m. A single or double, 2x1 m pipe frame neuston net fitted with 0.950 mm mesh netting is the other standard gear employed and it is towed at the surface with the frame half-submerged for 10 minutes. Maximum bongo tow depth is calculated using the amount of wire paid out and the wire angle at the 'targeted' maximum tow depth, or observed and recorded in real time throughout the tow. A mechanical flowmeter is mounted off-center in the mouth of each bongo net to record the volume of water filtered. During surveys in the early part of the time series a flowmeter was placed in only one side of the bongo gear. Water volume filtered during bongo net tows ranges from ~20 to 600 m3 but is typically 30 to 40 m3 at the shallowest stations and 300 to 400 m3 at the deepest stations. This map presents the relative abundance (number per hour) of larval king mackerel, red snapper, spanish mackerel, and vermilion snapper by 30-minute longitude by latitude blocks. Data are from 2,342 bongo net samples taken from 1986 to 2006 as part of plankton sampling associated with the Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) Fall Plankton Survey. Abundance is the number of fish larvae per 10 m2 of sea surface within each 0.5 degree longitude by latitude block. Data are limited to samples collected with 61 cm bongo nets fitted with 0.333 mm mesh nets.

Additional image formats and visualization tools:

Spanish Mackerel Atlas Dataset

Spot

Relative abundance (number per hour) of spot (Leiostomus xanthurus) by 10-minute longitude by latitude blocks summarized from 11,637 40-ft shrimp trawls taken during the Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) fishery-independent Summer and Fall Shrimp/Groundfish Surveys from 1987 to 2009. Catches of spot are standardized to account for sampling effort (CPUE) and expressed as the number of fish per 1 hour tow. Mean CPUE is then summarized by 10 minute longitude by latitude blocks in which trawling occurred.

Additional image formats and visualization tools:

Spot Atlas Dataset

Vermilion Snapper

Gag grouper (juvenile,adult), red grouper (juvenile,adult), red snapper (larval, juvenile, adult), and vermilion snapper (larval, juvenile) are routinely taken during Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) fishery-independent bottom longline (2000-2009), plankton (1986-2006), reef fish (1993-2009), and trawl (1987-2009) surveys throughout the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. This map presents the occurrence results from these surveys of these species.

Additional image formats and visualization tools:

Vermilion Snapper Atlas Dataset

Yellowedge Grouper

The Southeast Fisheries Science Center (SEFSC) Mississippi Laboratories has conducted standardized bottom longline surveys in the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, and Western North Atlantic Ocean since 1995. The objective of this longline survey is to provide fisheries independent data for stock assessment for as many species as possible. Relative abundance analysis for gag grouper, red grouper, red snapper, and yellowedge grouper are presented in this map. Relative abundance is expressed in catch per unit effort (CPUE). CPUE by 15-minute longitude by latitude blocks are summarized from 1,741 bottom longline sets taken during NMFS Bottom Longline Surveys from 2000 to 2009. CPUE is expressed as the number caught per 100-hook hour.

Additional image formats and visualization tools:

Yellowedge Grouper Atlas Dataset